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History: The Untold Story of Yaa Asantewaa

Yaa Asantewaa (c. 1840 – 17 October 1921) (pronounced was queen mother of Ejisu in the Ashanti Empire – now part of modern-day Ghana, appointed by her brother Nana Akwasi Afrane Opese, the Edwesuhene, or ruler, of Edwesu. In 1900 she led the Ashanti war known as the War of the Golden Stool, also known as the Yaa Asantewaa war, against British colonialism

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Early years: 

Born in c. 1840 in Besease, in central Ghana, Yaa Asantewaa was the older of two children. Her brother, Afrane Panin, became the chief of Edweso, a nearby community. After a childhood without incident, she cultivated crops on the land around Boankra. She entered a polygamous marriage with a man from Kumsi, with whom she had a daughter.

Prelude to rebellion:

During her brother’s reign, Yaa Asantewaa saw the Ashanti Confederacy go through a series of events that threatened its future, including civil war from 1883 to 1888. When her brother died in 1894, Yaa Asantewaa used her right as Queen Mother to nominate her own grandson as Ejisuhene. When the British exiled him to the Seychelles in 1896, along with the King of Asante Prempeh I and other members of the Asante government, Yaa Asantewaa became regent of the Ejisu–Juaben district. After the deportation of Prempeh I, the British governor-general of the Gold CoastFrederick Hodgson, demanded the Golden Stool, the symbol of the Asante nation.[2] This request led to a secret meeting of the remaining members of the Asante government at Kumasi, to discuss how to secure the return of their king. There was a disagreement among those present on how to go about this. Yaa Asantewaa, who was present at this meeting, stood and addressed the members of the council with these now-famous words

Now I have seen that some of you fear to go forward to fight for our king. If it were the brave days of Osei TutuOkomfo Anokye and Opuku Ware I, chiefs would not sit down to see their king taken without firing a shot. No white man could have dared to speak to the Chief of Asante in the way the governor spoke to you chiefs this morning. Is it true that the bravery of Asante is no more? I cannot believe it. It cannot be! I must say this: if you, the men of Asante, will not go forward, then we will. I shall call upon my fellow women. We will fight the white men. We will fight till the last of us falls on the battlefield.

Yaa Asantewaa was chosen by a number of regional Asante kings to be the war-leader of the Asante fighting force. This is the first and only example for a woman to be given that role in Asante history

The rebellion and its aftermath:

Beginning in March 1900, the rebellion laid siege to the fort at Kumasi where the British had sought refuge. The fort still stands today as the Kumasi Fort and Military Museum. After several months, the Gold Coast governor eventually sent a force of 1,400 to quell the rebellion. During the fighting, Queen Yaa Asantewaa and fifteen of her closest advisers were captured, and they, too, were sent into exile to the Seychelles.The rebellion represented the final war in the Anglo-Asante series of wars that lasted throughout the 19th century. On 1 January 1902 the British were finally able to accomplish what the Asante army had denied them for almost a century, and the Asante empire was made a protectorate of the British crown.

Yaa Asantewaa died in exile in the Seychelles on 17 October 1921. Three years after her death, on 27 December 1924, Prempeh I and the other remaining members of the exiled Asante court were allowed to return to Asante. Prempeh I made sure that the remains of Yaa Asantewaa and the other exiled Asantes were returned for a proper royal burial.Yaa Asantewaa’s dream for an Asante free of British rule was realized on 6 March 1957, when the Asante protectorate gained independence as part of Ghana, the first African nation in Sub-Saharan Africa to achieve this feat.

Social roles of Asante women:

The experience of seeing a woman serving as political and military head of an empire was foreign to British colonial troops in 19th-century Africa. Yaa Asantewaa’s call upon the women of the Asante Empire is based on the political obligations of Akan women and their respective roles in legislative and judicial processes. The hierarchy of male stools among the Akan people was complemented by female counterparts. Within the village, elders who were heads of the matrilineages (mpanyimfo), constituted the village council known as the ôdekuro. The women known as the mpanyinfo, referred to as aberewa or ôbaa panyin, were responsible for looking after women’s affairs. For every ôdekuro, an ôbaa panyin acted as the responsible party for the affairs of the women of the village and served as a member of the village council.

The head of a division, the ôhene, and the head of the autonomous political community, the ômanhene, had their female counterparts known as the ôhemaa: a female ruler who sat on their councils. The ôhemaa and ôhene were all of the same mogya, blood or localized matrilineage. The occupant of the female stool in Kumasi state, the Asantehemaa, and therefore, the united Asante, since her male counterpart was ex-officio of the Asanthene, was a member of the Kôtôkô Council, the Executive Committee or Cabinet of the Asanteman Nhyiamu, General Assembly of Asante rulers. Female stool occupants participated not only in the judicial and legislative processes but also in the making and unmaking of war, and the distribution of land

Place in history and cultural legacy:

Yaa Asantewaa remains a much-loved figure in Asante history and the history of Ghana as a whole for her role in confronting the colonialism of the British. She is immortalized in song as follows:

Koo koo hin koo

Yaa Asantewaa ee!

Obaa basia

Ogyina apremo ano ee!

Waye be egyae

Na Wabo mmode yaa asantewaa

The woman who fights before cannons

You have accomplished great things

You have done well”

To highlight the importance of encouraging more female leaders in Ghanaian society, the Yaa Asantewaa Girls’ Secondary School was established at Kumasi in 1960 with funds from the Ghana Education Trust.

In 2000 week-long centenary celebrations were held in Ghana to acknowledge Yaa Asantewaa’s accomplishments. As part of these celebrations, a museum was dedicated to her at Kwaso in the Ejisu–Juaben District on 3 August 2000. Unfortunately, a fire on 23 July 2004 destroyed several historical items, including her sandals and battle dress (batakarikese) seen in the photograph above. The current Queen-mother of Ejisu is Yaa Asantewaa II. A second Yaa Asantewaa festival was held 1–5 August 2006 in Ejisu.


 

Rapper Nelly arrested for alleged rape

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TMZ is exclusively reporting that rapper Nelly has been arrested for allegedly raping a woman in Washington.

Law enforcement sources tell TMZ that the women claims the incident occurred while on the hip hop star’s tour bus in Washington, where he’s been performing with Florida Georgia Line, as they were set to hit the stage on Saturday night in Ridgefield, Washington.

TMZ added that the alleged rape occurred early Saturday morning at about 3:45 AM, and that Nelly has been specifically said to be the one who committed the act.

And TMZ also posted a video of Nelly appearing in good spirits while taking hits and blowing out smoke, hours before the arrest, telling fans that the first one to come up to him and say “all work and no play,” would be given four free tickets to “tomorrow’s” Ridgefield show.

Professionally known as Nelly, 42, the rapper, singer and actor whose real name is Cornell Iral Haynes Jr, was booked on second degree rape charges Saturday morning at around 7 AM, TMZ reports, adding that he was in custody at the time their news story broke.

TMZ added that the alleged rape occurred early Saturday morning at about 3:45 AM, and that Nelly has been specifically said to be the one who committed the act.

And TMZ also posted a video of Nelly appearing in good spirits while taking hits and blowing out smoke, hours before the arrest, telling fans that the first one to come up to him and say “all work and no play,” would be given four free tickets to “tomorrow’s” Ridgefield show.

Professionally known as Nelly, 42, the rapper, singer and actor whose real name is Cornell Iral Haynes Jr, was booked on second degree rape charges Saturday morning at around 7 AM, TMZ reports, adding that he was in custody at the time their news story broke.

Born in Austin, Texas, the rapper is best known for his Midwest sound, busting on to the scene with 2000 album “Country Grammar,” which sold over 8.4 million copies. His follow-up in 2002 “Nellyville,” brought memorable number one hits like “Hot in Herre” and “Dilemma” (featuring Kelly Rowland).’

Nelly’s lawyer commented to TMZ: “Nelly is the victim of a completely fabricated allegation. Our initial investigation, clearly establishes the allegation is devoid of credibility and is motivated by greed and vindictiveness. I am confident, once the scurrilous accusation is thoroughly investigated, there will be no charges. Nelly is prepared to pursue all all legal avenues to redress any damage caused by this clearly false allegation.”

 

Free SHS: Rastafarian Girl Denied Admission Into Accra Girls

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A parent seeking a admission for his ward at the Accra Girls Senior High School has been denied because she had dreadlocks.

According to the father, his daughter is a Rastafarian and it is against their religion to cut off the locks.

The distraught father, name withheld, said efforts to explain issues to school authorities proved futile.

He is convinced their decision to deny his daughter admission is borne out of ignorance.

“I tried to see the headmistress. She was locked in her office. We want to see her to clarify things. We are Rastafarians as such our kids need to be educated…I don’t see why she won’t be able to keep her locks …” the worried father told Adom FM.

He believes Rastafarians in Ghana are being disregarded and disrespected and as such called on the government to intervene.

Meanwhile, the National Secretary of the Conference of Heads of Assisted Secondary Schools (CHASS), Mr Samuel Gyebi Yeboah has urged head teachers at various Senior high Schools to offer Rastafarian students’ admission.

He also advised parents whose wards are being denied admission to forward their concerns to the Ghana Education Service for immediate action to be taken.